Archive for the ‘Artists’ Category

What Is Feature Graph?

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014 by

Feature Graph is a system that we are using to categorize every asset on TurboSquid. This new system not only provides a better search result for assets, but Feature Graph creates better listings and product placement. No longer are you subject to a small set of categories that may or may not accurately describe your model — Feature Graph has over 13,000 categories.

Improved Publishing & Search Results

Let’s start with the asset “apple.” As a homonym, this can be taken in multiple ways: is it an Apple iPhone or an apple that is a fruit?  The old ways of searching for “apple” would have resulted in products of both types – iPhones and fruits. This distinction can now be made thanks to Feature Graph.  If you want to search for apple, simply select the fruit from the drop-down menu, based on your intent. Once you have made your selection, you will only see apples of the fruit variety in the the search results– nothing else.

Another example of the benefit of Feature Graph can be demonstrated by a search for “hot dog.” This instance proves that the keywords used to describe some products can actually harm the visibility of an asset. When an artist uses “hot” and “dog” as a keyword that describes an asset, the old system would display the keyword search for “dog.”  This is clearly the wrong result, as the asset is not an animal. Feature Graph does not  rely on keywords to determine what an asset is, so it properly identifies a “hot dog” as food and places it into the correct category. The outcome is a search results page that no longer includes hot dogs in the mix when a customer or artist searches for “dog.”

There is also a hierarchy tree set up for all assets. Let’s use “clownfish” as an example; if a customer were to type in animal, sea creature, fish, coral fish, anemone fish, fishes,  tropical fish, arcanthurus, amphiprioninae, clown fish, or clownfish, they would see this asset in those lists:

This helps your product’s visibility and reduces the amount of spam and incorrectly-keyworded assets from showing up in those categories.

Product Pricing

As many of our artists have experienced, CheckMate enforces a strict pricing policy, put into place partially  to prevent undercutting. Feature Graph gives the CheckMate Inspectors a way to more accurately determine the average selling price of all assets of the same type of model. This information will provide the information needed to help TurboSquid to fend off undercutting, especially as we continue to view each model submitted against comparable assets.

Help Us Improve Feature Graph

While the number of categories continues to expand, there will likely come a time when a specific category does not have representation with an asset. This is bound to happen as we strive to categorize all of the objects in the world. We are currently developing a tool for artists to add brands to Feature Graph that aren’t yet listed  This is where you, our artists, come in: help us to better categorize your assets. Simply email us at  breadcrumbs@turbosquid.com with the product ID or URL, as well as suggestions for the specific category or brand name that you feel best represents the model. With your help, along with our own research, we can categorize every asset on TurboSquid, making it a place that allows your assets easy visibility and ultimate profitability.

Corey Cambre is a TurboSquid CheckMate Inspector.  In addition to this post, he has also detailed the process behind getting our artists’ models through the CheckMate Pro v2 Certification.

Artist Spotlight: Andor Kollar

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014 by

blog_preview_Andor-KollarOur new featured image is one great looking male model in every sense of the word.  Its creator, Andor Kollar, is an accomplished CG Supervisor and character artist who believes that his roots in traditional drawing have served him well in making great 3D models.  We were honored to have him answer our Featured Artist Interview, where Andor reflected on what it takes to create expressive art.

Andor-Kollar_assets2

Have you always been an artist?  What attracted you to 3D?

I think I was always interested in the arts, probably from the time I was born.  I’ve always tried to embrace the many things that interest me.  I am fascinated by the combination of art and culture in the world, which helped to inform my love of drawing and my traditional art background.   In the Middle Ages, they painted with oil and carved marble sculptures… Nowadays, computer graphics are the new, exciting tool with which we express our imagination.  Making 3D graphics is like creating a new world.

 

What do you think is your biggest priority when making 3D models?  Do you have any advice for other modelers? 

I’m a character artist, primarily. My biggest priority is to work with passion and fill up my characters with soul.   It’s work, but I also really enjoy playing with the models.   And I can’t rest until I’ve perfectly expressed the personality of the character I’ve created.

As artists, I think our own expressions and emotions show in our work very much.  Developing mentally plays a big part in developing artistically, because our personalities imprint on whatever we put back into the world. I think software knowledge isn’t enough to make successful work, because over the years, those methods always change. But someone who has good vision and can draw well has the biggest advantage.  It’s also important to be observant and have a strong understanding of shapes, forms, proportions, and details.

 

It looks as though perfecting your male model is an ongoing process.  What else is on the horizon for you as a 3D artist?

I have always been inspired by the human body and anatomy.  I think it’s brilliant, trying to capture a character’s personality.  That’s the most important and most difficult thing for a character artist. So, yes— building [the male model] is an ongoing process for me, because I get better and better from all the work I’ve put into it.

My plan is to keep going and make more perfect, more realistic, and more artistic characters.

 

What has been your experience with CheckMate?  Do you have any opinions on CheckMate Pro v2?

I think CheckMate is a very good idea, because I’m a perfectionist and I always like clean models and a clear workflow. When I work as a CG Supervisor, I can also see things from the customer’s point of view and how it’s very important to purchase clean work that’s aesthetically pleasing and technically detailed.

I think CheckMate v2 has a more precise workflow, and I like it.

 

How long have you been with TurboSquid? Would you or have you recommended TurboSquid to others?

I’ve been a TurboSquid artist since 2011. I liked the site and believed that if I uploaded my work, it would be successful. Before TurboSquid, I had previous experience on AAA games like Heroes of Might and Magic VThe Witcher; Silent Hill: OriginsRise of the Argonauts; F.E.A.R.; Extraction Point; and Overlord II.  This gave me the chance to get very good at making 3d models!

I would highly recommend TurboSquid to other artists. I think having a TurboSquid catalog is as good as having a 3D portfolio.

It was an honor to do this interview and to work with TurboSquid.

Thanks, Andor!  We’re pretty fond of you too.  Check out Andor’s Featured Model on our home page and you can check out more of his work on TurboSquid and on KollarAndor.com

Want to see your CheckMate Pro Certified Model featured on the TurboSquid Home Page? Anything is possible if you just SUBMIT YOUR MODEL!

TurboTips: V-Ray Blend Material, Part 3

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014 by

The following is part of our in-depth guide to the regular V-Ray Blend Material.  It will cover the theory behind many of the features of this material, and will also provide specific examples of settings, as well as tricks to use.  While the images used are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used for V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here will be generally useful for V-Ray for C4D, but the blend material acts quite differently in C4D.

Examples & Common Issues with V-Ray Blend Material

 

 

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TurboTips: V-Ray Blend Material, Part 2

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014 by

Last week, we gave you a little overview of the V-Ray Blend Material.  This week, we have an important question:

When should I use Blend over other types of materials?

1. When there are layered materials, where the base and coat can be seen clearly as different materials.

In the example below, you can see that the wood has a completely different reflection/highlight pattern than the glossy lacquer layer on top.

2. When an object has radically different surface properties in large areas.

In this example photo, it’s easier to create two different shaders for galvanized metal and rust and blend them together, instead of trying to do it all in one material.

3. When the object needs a specific shading effect that is not possible with a simple material.

A good example would be worn and/or slightly dirty metal that has glossy and blurred reflections at the same time.

4. When the shader needs to be easily and quickly modified.

Let’s say you have a rusty, painted metal material with three different types of surfaces: metal, paint, and rust. Theoretically, it would be possible to build elaborate mix maps and custom-painted textures to create all these effects in a single material… but imagine if you need to change the rust pattern. “Oh, yeah, the material looks great, just make it a bit less rusty!” What a nightmare! You would have to go through all the maps and adjust them, one by one, to make this “small” change.

Now imagine that you have 3-layered blend instead (Metal, Paint and Rust layers). Everything is controlled by two simple b&w masks that can be adjusted quickly and easily. This saves a lot of time and is far less frustrating.

 

Next week: we give you some examples and common issues with the V-Ray Blend Material.

This series of tutorials was made with our friends at Viscorbel.

If there are any topics you’d like to see in a future edition of  TurboTips, let us know in the comments below, or Tweet your question to @TurboSquid with hashtag #TurboTips.

TurboTips: V-Ray Blend Material, Part 1

Monday, June 9th, 2014 by

The following is an in-depth guide to the regular V-Ray Blend Material.  It will cover the theory behind many of the features of this material, and will also provide specific examples of settings, as well as tricks to use.  While the images used are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used for V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here will be generally useful for V-Ray for C4D, but the blend material acts quite differently in C4D.

Introduction

The V-Ray Blend Material could be best described as a utility material. It does not have any shading options, so it combines multiple other shaders in different ways.

 

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TurboTips: V-Ray Fast SSS2 Material, Part 3

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014 by

The following is an in-depth guide to the regular V-Ray Blend Material. In this series, we will cover the theory behind many of the features of the material.  We’ll also show specific examples of settings and give you some tricks to use. While the images used are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used for V-Ray for Maya. Currently, the SSS materials in V-Ray for C4D behave differently, so this tutorial will not be as valuable for C4D users.

This week, we’re concluding this series of TurboTips with information on the Specular Layer; a few more settings for the FastSSS2 Material; and a sample workflow to help you put it all together.

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