“Excuse me, I thought it was real.”

by Michele Bousquet

One of our Diamond CheckMate artists, dimosbarbos, had an interesting experience yesterday. A nostalgic customer found this great image of a Lasonic TRC-975 boombox through Google, and was thrilled at the idea of reliving his youth with this classic music maker. And all for just $79! Unfortunately, what the customer wanted was a real boombox and not a 3D model, even if it is Checkmate certified.

3D Model Boombox

It might seem surprising to you that such a “clean” rendering could be mistaken for the real thing. It’s true that this model doesn’t show the scratches and wear that are so common in the amateur photos on Ebay and CraigsList. This rendering bears more resemblance to a product shot displayed at a manufacturer’s website, where photographs are often touched up to make the product look super-clean.

For example, check out this image of a similar (and more recent) Lasonic boombox. Comparing the two images, you can see why the customer thought the TurboSquid boombox was real. And still in great condition, too!

Actually, customers thinking our 3D models are real is a common occurrence, particularly around the holiday season. It’s so common that we made a video about it last December! When shopping for holiday gifts, a $15 iPod is just too good to pass up. Apparently, the same goes for a $79 boombox that brings back joyful memories.

11 Responses to ““Excuse me, I thought it was real.””

  1. dimosbarbos says:

    It’s so funny :))))

  2. Makhota says:

    This is probably because the model does not differ from the actual

  3. Max says:

    Well some people are just “not smart”. They fill in CC details as soon as they see image. They download the file and after that complain they thought it was real.

  4. xoom3d says:

    hahaha

  5. mimi3d says:

    maybe the customer not to careful, because there is a wireframe image in there

  6. Personally I wouldn’t go for the iPod. I’d save up the extra 4 bucks and buy the London eye.
    http://www.turbosquid.com/3d-models/3d-model-london-eye/644562
    and maybe take an S class Mercedes for free
    http://www.turbosquid.com/FullPreview/Index.cfm/ID/244936

    This is quite unbelievable, as well as funny, and a little bit sad.

  7. Not funny says:

    Yeah, maybe some are stupid but for most this is just simple way to cheat and get refunds. This is clear and logical but TS still dont get it. By articles like this TS only get it worse by showing customers how to fool them.
    Short text on product page like “TS do not refund your money if your explanation is ‘I thought it was real” or pop up with text “This is not real thing but 3d model file” after add to cart would end it once and for all. But instead of that TS have a fun and vendors suffer because of someone incompetence.

  8. Michele Bousquet says:

    I am sorry you don’t trust us, after 12 years in business, to know the difference between a confused customer and someone trying to game the system. When a customer doesn’t download the model, then calls up to ask when it’s going to be shipped, it’s pretty obvious what happened. We often record these phone conversations and give the artist the recording when we issue the refund. I’m sorry you feel the need to call such customers “stupid”. I hope that when you make a mistake, no one calls you that.

    We don’t make the customer state “I know this is a 3D model” because that would slow down the purchase process for the 99.99% of our customers who know they are buying a 3D model.

  9. Spacecase3d says:

    But it IS real.. A real 3D model. Don’t you have to mark the “I agree to the terms, blah blah blah..” box before you submit the order? If you can’t be bothered with understanding what you’re buying, then I say no refund. Tell them it’s the cost of learning a valuable lesson.

  10. Michele Bousquet says:

    The customer agrees to the EULA when they sign up for a member account. It is standard business practice to allow a customer to cancel an order if the item hasn’t shipped yet. If the customer never downloads the item, then it hasn’t “shipped” and they can cancel it. What you are suggesting is that we keep money we made because the customer was fooled by a realistic rendering, and that we sink the entire company’s credibility so you can keep the pocket money you made from such a sale. This would not be a good business practice and would hurt everyone’s sales in the end.

    There has always been a tiny percentage of customers who think the items are real. The percentage hasn’t changed much, but the overall number has gone up because the overall number of customers has gone up. So instead of being upset over the $20 that you “lost” over such a refund, be happy that your items look so good that they’re probably selling well to legitimate customers.

  11. Niv says:

    I agree with you Michelle. If you wouldn’t refund than not only will you turn out looking bad but also it is unfair to the costumer if he didn’t even download the file.

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