TurboTips: V-Ray FastSSS2 Material, Part 2

May 19th, 2014 by

The following is an in-depth guide to the regular V-Ray Blend Material. In this series, we will cover the theory behind many of the features of the material.  We’ll also show specific examples of settings and give you some tricks to use. While the images used are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used for V-Ray for Maya. Currently, the SSS materials in V-Ray for C4D behave differently, so this tutorial will not be as valuable for C4D users.

Diffuse and SSS Layers

This is the most important (and, generally, the most confusing) part of the FastSSS2 material. The problem is, there are many different colors to set up and they all seem to affect one another in some way, so it can be a bit difficult to work non-destructively.

In this tutorial, we’ll attempt to de-mystify these settings so they’re a bit easier to work with.

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TurboTips: V-Ray FastSSS2 Material, Part 1

May 13th, 2014 by

The following is an in-depth guide to the regular V-Ray Blend Material. In this series, we will cover the theory behind many of the features of the material.  We’ll also show specific examples of settings and give you some tricks to use. While the images used are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used for V-Ray for Maya. Currently, the SSS materials in V-Ray for C4D behave differently, so this tutorial will not be as valuable for C4D users.

The V-Ray FastSSS2 Material is designed for creating translucent materials (ones that scatter the light inside the object). Some common examples are: skin, marble, wax, milk, etc.

Compared to the “translucency” option in the regular V-Ray Material, it has a far better sub-surface scattering model (SSS).  It is faster and much more advanced. For this reason, it’s preferable to use the FastSSS2 Material whenever you need to make a translucent shader.

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TurboTips: V-Ray Material, Part 5: Workflow

May 5th, 2014 by

In this series of Turbo Tips, we’re giving you an in-depth guide to regular V-Ray Material. We’ll cover the theory behind many of the features of the material and give you specific examples of settings and tricks to use. While the example images are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used in V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here is generally useful in V-Ray for C4D, but the specific fields and values may be different.

To wrap up this series, we’ll show you an example workflow for creating a material from scratch. It’s not set in stone and you can change the order around, as long as you’re paying attention to the general principles.

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TurboTips: V-Ray Material, Part 4: Translucency & Bump

April 29th, 2014 by

In this series of Turbo Tips, we’re giving you an in-depth guide to regular V-Ray Material. We’ll cover the theory behind many of the features of the material and give you specific examples of settings and tricks to use. While the example images are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used in V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here is generally useful in V-Ray for C4D, but the specific fields and values may be different.

 Last week, we talked about the Refraction tab.  This week, we’ll be moving on to Bump, but first: a quick tip about…

Translucency

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TurboTips: V-Ray Material, Part 3: Refraction

April 21st, 2014 by

In this series of Turbo Tips, we’re giving you an in-depth guide to regular V-Ray Material. We’ll cover the theory behind many of the features of the material and give you specific examples of settings and tricks to use. While the example images are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used in V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here is generally useful in V-Ray for C4D, but the specific fields and values may be different.

 Last week, we talked about the Reflection tab.  This week, we’ll be moving on to:

Refraction

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Artist Spotlight: HKV Studios

April 16th, 2014 by

blog_preview_HKVStudiosWhile the TurboSquid catalog is very diverse, it’s obvious that cars are some of our most popular 3D models.  Among the artists who specialize in sleek details and shapely chrome, stands HKV Studios, whose catalog is made up entirely of vehicles, both vintage and new.  This month, we’re featuring their BMW i8 model, and we had the pleasure of chatting with Artem Kabanov, the creative director and founder of HKV Studios.  In our Featured Artist Interview, Artem talks about what draws him to car modeling, as well as his long relationship with the CheckMate Standard.

HKVStudios_assets

 

How did you get your start as a 3D modeler?

I started my 3D artist career 10 years ago. It started from the hobby that wasn’t really linked with my education and specialty, which is economics and management. I always liked everything connected with machinery and engineering. When I was a kid, I liked to construct toy models of various vehicles – cars, trains, and helicopters. They had moving parts and engines, and they functioned just like the real ones… well, at least I believed they did. :)  3D modeling gave me a new opportunity to actualize my hobby.

 
Do you have any advice for other modelers?  What do you think is your biggest priority when making 3D models?

My advice is to find your passion that you would like to re-create in 3D. If you work with passion, this gives you an inexhaustible source of energy to improve and create the best products on the market.

When I model a car, I try to re-create every curve of the body as accurately as possible. I understand that behind any car design lies hundreds— or even thousands— of hours of artists’ and engineers’ work. You have to respect that work if you are getting into 3D car modeling.

 

 

Your catalog is amazing– lots of cars, and they all look fantastic.  What do you like about modeling cars?  Are there any models that you find particularly challenging to build?

I have loved cars as long as I can remember. They are my true passion.

I enjoy modeling concept cars the most. Those are the cars that stand at the peak of the technical progress. They’re considered to be technically revolutionary, which is underscored with a futuristic exterior and interior design. For example, Toyota Prius, Chevrolet Volt, and BMW i8: those cars looked and felt cosmic, or ultra-futuristic, three years before they hit the market, so they really brought the whole industry to another level.

 
What has been your experience with CheckMate?  Do you have any opinions on CheckMate Pro v1 versus Pro v2?

I started working with CheckMate when it was in beta. There were lots of grey areas there at that time, but overall, the process of certifying my first models went smoothly. Since then, the procedure has improved greatly thanks to implementation of the CheckMate queue into the dashboard design, as well as the number of scripts that are available for download and use. I do think there is a long way to go before the process becomes perfect, but what I see right now is that TurboSquid moves very confidently, with large steps, in the right direction.

If we speak about numbers and if the CheckMate certification pay-offs, my answer is undeniably positive. CheckMate models stand higher in the ranks and they have an attractive look that garners more views from potential customers. Customers are already convinced about the quality of CheckMate products, so their choice between certified or non-certified models, in most cases, is obvious.

The 3D industry improves as the customers’ requirements grow. In order to be a successful vendor, you should improve your techniques in accordance with those requirements. CheckMate really became a “bridge” between customer desire and artist vision. It is good to see that CheckMate Pro evolved to introduce V2. This allows us to create up-to-date models to keep the customers 100% satisfied. I look forward to the next updates!

 
How long have you been with TurboSquid? Would you recommend us to other 3D artists?

I have sold with TurboSquid since September 2005, so, almost nine years now. This is truly a great experience, which has changed my life tremendously. Selling through a website, worldwide, sounded unbelievable ten years ago.

TurboSquid and the 3D industry have evolved significantly. I enjoy watching the Throwback Thursday posts on the TurboSquid Facebook— it gives you a vivid look at how far the industry has jumped in ten years.  It is really great to be a part of this industry and, for sure, I advise everyone to join our great TurboSquid community and help us improve the industry together!

 

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