TurboSquid 3D Modeling Blog

3D Modeling

TurboTips: V-Ray Material, Part 1: Diffuse

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by

In this series of Turbo Tips, we’re giving you an in-depth guide to regular V-Ray Material. We’ll cover the theory behind many of the features of the material and give you specific examples of settings and tricks to use. While the example images are from 3ds Max, the same concepts and settings can be used in V-Ray for Maya. The information covered here is generally useful in V-Ray for C4D, but the specific fields and values may be different.

The VRayMtl is the main workhorse for creating shaders in V-Ray. Eighty percent of the time, it is all you’ll need to create realistic results that also render quite fast. It is optimized to work with all other aspects of V-Ray (lights, GI, sampling, etc.), so it should always be used instead of 3ds Max native materials.

Main components

Generally, the main components of a CG shader are:

  • Diffuse

  • Reflection

  • Refraction

  • Bump

These are the names that V-Ray uses. They may have different names in different renderers, but the functions are pretty much the same.

Diffuse gives the basic color to the shader; reflection controls how the the shader reflects light; refraction controls how it lets the light through; and bump simulates a distortion of the object’s surface.

With the exception of the refraction, the other 3 components should be present in all materials.

This week, we’ll talk about the first of the main components:

(more…)

TurboTips: An In-Depth Look at Falloff Maps

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014 by

Falloff maps are an extremely powerful tool for artists to utilize when creating procedural shaders. They are essential when trying to create any realistic shader that is reflective or has color changing properties like chrome, metals, and pearlescent paint.  In order to use Falloff maps effectively, it is important to understand how the map works.

In this week’s edition of Turbo Tips, we’ll explain the ins and outs of Falloff map parameters.  For our purposes, we are demonstrating with 3ds Max, but the ideas and concepts can be used in many other 3D programs.

(more…)

TurboTips: Scene Optimizations & Best Practices, Part 4

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014 by

It is very easy to zone out and work away without thinking about your scene, naming, or organization. Before you know it, you have a few dozen cloned objects named Box#### or a Material Editor full of textures named # – Default, and if you take a break, you may not always remember what’s what, or what’s applied to where.

Our Turbo Tip of the week (and possibly of the year– this advice is that important!): keep things simple by naming and organizing as you go.

For now, this will be our final post in our series on Scene Optimizations & Best Practices.  If you have a topic or question you’d like to see addressed in a future edition of Turbo Tips, check out the bottom of this post to find out how to get in touch with us.

(more…)

TurboTips: Scene Optimizations & Best Practices, Part 2

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014 by

Navigation using the layer editor is something every artist should do, or at least know how to do; it’s a powerful tool when it comes to organizing a scene. The layer editor makes it quick to select objects and groups, and offers a variety of other controls. Layers are retained when importing or merging scenes together, so its important to understand how to organize them efficiently.

This is the second part of our four-part series on Scene Optimizations and Best Practices.  For our purposes, we are demonstrating below with screen shots from 3ds Max, but these fundamentals can be applied to other software packages.

2. Using Layers

LayerEditor

Compared to the layer editor on the left, it may seem that the layer editor on the right is less organized, but it’s only because there is more information. That’s a good thing, since objects can quickly be hidden, frozen, or selected from the Layer Editor. It’s also important to note that all the names are short, yet descriptive enough for you to know which objects you are working with. This makes the scene very easy to navigate.

The “Lights” layer contains all the light objects and lighting components in the scene. The “StageLayer” contains all the floor and camera objects that make the scene. The “Gym_410” is the layer that contains all the parts of the model so it has the name of the model, which is required by the specification.

 

2.1. More, or Less

Layers_1

To make the layer editor less busy, a layer can always be collapsed when not in use. Right-clicking on an object name brings up a variety of options, including access to the Object Properties. Layers are extremely useful when working in a scene to isolate major components of the scene from each other.

You can see in the left side image above that the 3 layers the file has been separated into are collapsed. When working on just the model, you can easily hide the two other layers from being visible, so you only see layer “Gym_410” contents in the viewport.

Layers_2

Adding new layers, editing layers, and organizing existing layers can be done by using the buttons at the top of the Layer Editor menu.

Calvin Bryson is the Senior Technical Artist at TurboSquid, and a 3ds Max expert.  If there are any topics you’d like to see in a future edition of  TurboTips, let us know in the comments below, or Tweet your question to @TurboSquid with hashtag #TurboTips.

Artist Spotlight: Tornado Studio

Monday, January 27th, 2014 by

blog_preview_TornadoStudioWhile the world’s Olympians get ready for the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Tornado Studio takes the gold medal in 3D modeling with this downhill skier, our newest featured image.  We were happy to get to talk with Martin Kostov, the founder and CEO of Tornado Studio, whose team has contributed a lot of great CheckMate models to the TurboSquid catalog.
TornadoStudio_assets

How long have you been an artist, and how did you get started in 3D?

I have been a 3D artist for more than 10 years now.

While I was in high school I came a across an image of a satellite in space that I thought was a real photo. To my surprise, it was a 3D rendering and that astonished me. At that point I decided that this was what I want to do in life. Not long after I started exploring 3ds Max, I found about TurboSquid and the possibilities of selling 3D assets.

 

Do you have any advice for other modelers? What do you think is most important for artists who make 3D models?

We are all in this together– try to find your own part of the market, make only products that you would buy if you were the customer, and never copy other people’s work.

The main advice I have for people who want to be successful is to take the time to study references and create quality products. If you do end up making a product that other people have as well, at least try to make it better looking and match the price, or go higher.

 

How long have you been with TurboSquid? Would you or have you recommended TurboSquid to others?

I’ve been a seller on Turbosquid for the last 9 years or so, the market has grown and changed a lot since then, but my answer to, ” Where should I sell my 3D stock? ” hasn’t changed at all. TurboSquid is the only place I would sell my models, even if I was starting again today, knowing what I now know.

 

What has been your experience with CheckMate? Do you have any opinions on CheckMate Pro v1 versus Pro v2?

My team and I were one of the first vendors to try the CheckMate certification process before it was even public. My reaction then was… that this kind of differentiation for the quality of products is exactly what the market needs. Now, a few years later, CheckMate has proven to be the right path for anyone who is serious about selling 3D.

TurboSquid has shared statistics from the CheckMate sales, relative to the sales of the other 95% of the models, and you don’t have to be an expert to see that the future is in certified 3D stock. Clients want to buy a product that will do the job they need, without problems, and this is what Checkmate guarantees.

Even moreso with the new Pro v2, the quality standard has risen yet again. TurboSquid is doing an amazing job in leading the new developments in the industry and we at Tornado Studio feel privileged to be in the Squid Guild and sell exclusively in the best 3D market place there is. If there is something I would recommend for Checkmate V3 is that submissions for CheckMate certification be checked for “copycat” and “defective pricing” signs.

 

You have a lot of sports equipment in your catalog. Do you have any must-watch winter sports? What events to you like the best at the Winter Olympics?

We at Tornado Studio are big sports fans– we love watching and playing sports. My personal favorite discipline from the Winter Olympics is Ski Jumping. I can only imagine what feelings the athletes experience while sliding down the ramp and jumping in the air. If I ever get the chance to ski jump myself, I would gladly try it out.

 

Want to see your CheckMate Pro Certified Model featured on the TurboSquid Home Page? Anything is possible if you just SUBMIT YOUR MODEL!

TurboTips: Scene Optimizations & Best Practices, Part 1

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014 by

Keeping your scene clean and organized is important while making any 3D model. A well constructed scene will make modelling and editing your own model easier, and it may encourage customers to buy your product. The examples below are from 3ds Max, but these concepts can apply to any 3D package.

 

1. Organize Objects

If a 3D scene is difficult to navigate and/or modify, then editing a model within that scene can become extremely frustrating for the person attempting to use the model. (And this frustration is usually enough to make someone look elsewhere for a model that is easier to edit and use.) Industry professionals want a model that is ready for production and is quickly editable to fit their needs. No matter how great the model looks, poor scene organization can make it unusable to them.

Bad Organization_1

The treadmill model (pictured above) is a good example of an object that shouldn’t be combined or merged into one single object. Merging the model creates lots of subobject elements that are very difficult to sort through and edit. Not only would it be difficult for you to go back and adjust the model later, it would also be difficult for the customer who purchased the model.

Bad Organization_3

Bad Organization_4

 

If an artist wants to edit any part of this model, they would need to go into element mode to sort through the different pieces looking for all the parts that make up what they want to edit. Then, they will have to hide the unselected elements within the object to get a full view of the pieces they want, or detach the elements into a new object. This makes it very inconvenient and time consuming for the end user to make changes. Combining your model into a single object makes more work for everyone.

 

1.1. Naming

Good Organization_2

Name all objects and textures in the scene. The names must be descriptive enough so that anyone could look at the layer editor and quickly select the desired object. Never leave anything as the default name such as Cylinder03, Object05, Map #6(VrayMtl).

Naming

You can see in zoomed image above that every object has been renamed descriptively after separating the model out from one single object. If you select any of the names like “Console_Screws”, the descriptive name gives you a good indication of where to look on the model for this object. The first word indicates what larger part of the model to look; “Console” . The second word lets you know specifically which part of the model will be selected; “Screws”. You will also notice that naming this way makes selection very easy from the layer editor since all parts of the model will sort alphabetically.

 

1.2. Intelligent Combining & Merging

Good Organization_3

Merging multiple objects into one larger object should only be done when it logically makes sense. For example, the screws on the back of the console are combined into one object named Console_Screws instead of having 13 individual screw objects.

Calvin Bryson is the Senior Technical Artist at TurboSquid, and a 3ds Max expert.  If there are any topics you’d like to see in a future edition of  TurboTips, let us know in the comments below, or Tweet your question to @TurboSquid with hashtag #TurboTips.

 Next week in TurboTips: Using Layers, Part 2 of 5 in our series on Optimizing Scenes & Best Practices

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Site Map © 2013 TurboSquid