Author Archive

How-To Video: Fixing Ngons in 3ds Max

Thursday, October 25th, 2012 by

 

You under According to 2.2.1 in the CheckMate Pro Specification, the topology must be quads and triangles only for CheckMate Pro Certification.

This video will show you how to find and fix Ngons in 3ds Max. Ngons are polygons with more than 4 sides. The reason Ngons are not allowed in CheckMate Pro is due to the fact that models with Ngons are hard to animate and edit.

There are several ways to eliminate Ngons. The first and most important way is fixing them by hand. We highly recommend that you go through and fix them by hand because that is the best way to keep clean/good topology- which is required for CheckMate Pro Certification.

As you can see, I already have a model open in 3ds Max 2012.

  1. First, we want to “Unhide All” so right-click and choose “Unhide All”.
  2. Make sure the model is ungrouped. If you are not sure, select the model and then select  “Group” > “Ungroup” from the top of the program; confirm that it is not grouped or select the option to ungroup.
  3. Next run the CheckMate Pro Script to find out which objects have Ngons.
    Download the script from the link provided then go to MAXScript and choose the CheckMate Pro Script; you can also open the script from wherever you have saved it on your system.
    When the Script window pops-up click “[Update]”.
    When the script finishes, in the middle in the “Ngons” column you can see which objects have Ngons. If there is the #5 or higher in the brackets then there are Ngons.
  4. Now we can go down the list and select the Ngons that we want to fix. Select one of the object with Ngons and when you do that you can see that that object shows up in the modify panel.
  5. Minimize the script and in the modify panel extend Editable Poly by clicking the “+” and choose “Polygon”.
  6. Now, we are going to use the Graphite Modeling Tools to find the Ngons (these are available in Max 2010 and later). To open the Graphite Modeling Tools go to “Customize” at the top, then select “Show UI” and check “Show Ribbon”.
  7. Once the Graphite Modeling Tools Panel is up, choose “Selection” and then “By Numeric” and then choose greater than “>” and for sides we want to input “4” so that it is only showing up the Ngons and then click the arrow “õ” to select.
  8. Now that we have identified the Ngons, we are going to manually fix them by connecting vertices. On the modify tab, choose “Vertex” and then choose two vertices that you want to connect. Select one vertex and hold down “Ctrl” and select the other one to divide off the part you want from the Ngon.
  9. Click “Connect” on the Modify panel.
  10. Now, when you choose “Polygon” selection again and under “By Numeric” you click the arrow again, the areas you connected will no longer highlight as Ngons.

The model used in this video was selected from a collection of 3D bags by 3D artist archstyle.

How-To Video: Fixing Isolated Vertices in 3ds Max

Thursday, October 4th, 2012 by

Check out our latest artist tutorial especially useful for those working through the steps to submit models for CheckMate Pro certification. The specification states (in item 2.1.1) that there can be no Isolated Vertices found in models submitted for certification. We hope this video will serve as a useful guide for 3D artists to find and fix Isolated Vertices using xView in 3ds Max 2010 or later prior, moving them closer to submitting their models for consideration.

  1. Find “xView” in the drop-down menu and once your mouse is over it another set of options will appear and you want to select “Isolated Vertices”.
  2. Go to “Customize”, then “Units Setup…”, and select “Generic Units” so that it matches our CheckMate script.
  3. Select the model.
  4. Go to the bottom and select “[Click Here To Update]”. All Isolated Vertices will appear in green.
  5. Select the object with Isolated Vertices that you would like to fix, then again select “[Click Here To Update]” at the bottom.
  6. Go to the modify tab, and under “Selection” choose “Vertex”.
  7. To fix the Isolated Vertices you want to go to the bottom and right-click where it says “[Isolated Vertices: # Vertices]” and choose “Select Results”.
  8. Press “delete” on your keyboard.

Visit our Knowledge Base for additional 3ds Max instructional videos.

The CheckMate Pro model used in this video is a Space Suit 3D model by 3D artist radoxist.

 

How-To Video: Fixing Overlapping Vertices in 3ds Max

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012 by

Got 5 Minutes? Then you have time for this video outlining how to find and fix overlapping Vertices using xView in 3ds Max 2010 or later.

  1. Find “xView” in the drop-down menu and once your mouse is over it another set of options will appear and you want to select “Overlapping Faces”.
  2. Go to “Customize”, then “Units Setup…”, and select “Generic Units” so that it matches our CheckMate script.
  3. Then, at the bottom click where it says “[Click Here To Configure]”.
  4. Change the “Tolerance:” to 0.0001.
  5. Select the model.
  6. Some versions will automatically show you the Overlapping Vertices, if not, go to the bottom and select “[Click Here To Update]”. All Overlapping Vertices will appear in green.
  7. Choose the Overlapping Vertices that you would like to fix, then go to the modify tab, and under “Selection” choose “Vertex”.
  8. Click and drag to select the Overlapping Vertices that you chose to fix.
  9. On the modify panel, click the settings button next to the “Weld” button and set your “Weld Threshold” to what you would like. I did 0.001.
  10. Then, click the “Weld” button.

In most cases that will work. However, if that does not work then it probably means that there are unnecessary Overlapping Faces that need to be removed. The next few steps will explain how to fix this issue:

  1. Make sure the Overlapping Vertices that you have chosen to fix are selected, then right-click and select “Convert to Face”.
  2. Then, alt+click to deselect all the faces that you can see that have been highlighted in red.
  3. Click delete to delete the unneeded Overlapping Faces.
  4. Repeat steps 7-10.

That is how you find and fix overlapping vertices using xView in 3ds Max 2010 or later.

Want more? We’ve created a number of helpful “how to” videos for artist. Click here to view them all on our YouTube channel

How-To Video: Fixing Overlapping Faces in 3ds Max

Monday, September 17th, 2012 by

This video will show you how to find and fix overlapping faces using xView in 3ds Max 2010 or later.

  1. Select the model.
  2. If grouped, ungroup the model.
  3. Go to “Customize”, then “Units Setup…”, and select “Generic Units” so that it matches our CheckMate script.
  4. Find “xView” in the drop-down menu and once your mouse is over it another set of options will appear and you want to select “Overlapping Faces”.
  5. Again, make sure the model is selected, then at the bottom click where it says “[Click Here To Configure]”.
  6. Change the “Tolerance:” to 0.0001.
  7. Choose an overlapping face that you would like to fix, then go to the modify tab, and under “Selection” choose “Polygon”.
  8. Select the overlapping face that you chose to fix and it should highlight in red or be outlined in red.
  9. Now there are two options to fix the overlapping faces:
    • You can choose “Select and Move” and move the X-coordinate (or whatever coordinate is appropriate) out slightly, or
    • At the bottom, select “Absolute Mode Transform Type-In” and enter in the X-coordinate (or whatever coordinate is appropriate) how much you want the face to move out from its original location (in the video I moved it out 0.01).

Visit our Knowledge Base for additional 3ds Max instructional videos.

The CheckMate Lite 3D model of an Ikea-style chair used in the creation of this video by TurboSquid artist Studio Mozo.

 

How-To Video: Making a Wireframe Thumbnail using Scanline or mental ray for 3ds Max

Friday, August 10th, 2012 by

This quick tutorial walks through the process of making a wireframe thumbnail using Scanline or mental ray for 3ds Max.  The steps presented in the video are outlined below.

  1. Open 3ds Max file.
  2. If it’s a Scanline file, change renderer to mental ray.
  3. Go to the material editor (m).
  4. Change the material from “Standard” to “Composite” by pressing the button that says “Standard” and choosing “Composite” from the material drop down.
  5. Select the “Base Material:” and by changing the diffuse color you can control the wireframe background color.
  6. Select “Go to Parent”.
  7. Next to “Mat. 1:” select the “None” button and change it to a standard material from the material drop down (this will take you to the screen where you can control the wireframes).
  8. Check “Wire” under the “Sharer Basic Parameters”
  9. Adjust the wire color by changing the diffuse color.
  10. Under “Extended Parameters”, you can change the wire size in the top right corner.
  11. Select the model, and apply the wireframe material to the model by dragging and dropping or by clicking on “Assign Material to Selection”.
  12. To change the thumbnail background you can go to the “Rendering” drop down and choose “Environment” and select the box under “Color:” to adjust the color to your liking.
  13. Render your wireframe thumbnail by going to “Render Production” at the top right.
  14. Save your render by selecting save image.

 

Remember: For CheckMate Pro the wireframe thumbnail background must be of neutral tone and distinctively different than the non-wireframe images. And, the wire color must be black, white, or gray. Other colors are allowed at TurboSquid Inspector discretion.

Click here to learn more about Wireframe Thumbnails.

Featured Model used in the creation of this video is a Russian Battle Tank by TurboSquid artist 3d_molier.

 

TS Talks CheckMate During Visit to Boston AAUGA Meeting

Friday, March 23rd, 2012 by

 

TurboSquid’s CheckMate Ambassador, Michele Bousquet, was lucky enough to spend some time with some wicked smart folks during the  Boston AAUGA March member meeting. Those in attendance included 3D pros representing a vast cross section of industries from game development to medical visualization, even students from local art colleges.

While most in the crowd were already members of TurboSquid, few knew of the level of impact that CheckMate has had on the 3D industry as a whole. Things really got interesting as a chart (shown below) demonstrating how the relatively few models within the TurboSquid catalog that are CheckMate certified are responsible for a significant percentage of total sales.  (more…)

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Site Map © 2013 TurboSquid