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Making a Quad Sphere, Part 2: Softimage & LightWave

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013 by

We’ve already covered how to make a quad sphere for CheckMate Pro v2 in three different programs (3ds Max, Maya, and Cinema 4D).

In case you missed it: The default sphere is problematic because of the two poles. By itself, a standard sphere does not seem to pose any problems, but when it comes time to subdivide, the differences in polygon density at the equator and at the poles produces pinching, and squashes the sphere around the equator.

To round out our list, we’ve put together tutorials for two more programs: Softimage and LightWave.

 

Softimage Quad Sphere

1.  Go to the model module

xsi_01

 

2.  Create a cube

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3.  Suggested specifications – Length: 8; Subdivisions: 12 x 12 x 12

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4.  Create a sphere (Note: the cube should be bigger than the sphere)

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5.  Suggested specifications – Radius: 3; Subdivisions: 24 x 24

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6.  Keep the sphere and the cube at the same location

7.  Select the cube

8.  Go to Modify > Deform > Shrink Wrap

xsi_08

 

9.  Select the sphere (you can use the Explorer to do this)

10.  Right-click on the viewport

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LightWave Quad Sphere

Click any screenshot below for full resolution.

1.  Under the create tab, look on the menu for “Primitives” and select “Box”

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2.  At the bottom of the program, select “Numeric” or hit “n” to bring  up the Numeric window

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3.  Choose the desired width, height, and depth you need to create your cube.  Be sure to add as many segments as you want or need for the cube.

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4.  Go to the “Modify” tab at the top of the program.  Then at the menu under “Transform,” go to the “More” tab.

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5.  Select “Spherize”

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6.  Enjoy your quadsphere

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Previously: Making a Quad Sphere (for 3ds Max, Maya, and Cinema 4d)

 

Making a Quad Sphere: 3ds Max, Maya, & Cinema 4D

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 by

We’re going to go over how to make a quad sphere in 3ds Max, Maya and Cinema 4D, for CheckMate Pro v2.

The default sphere is problematic because of the two poles. By itself, a standard sphere does not seem to pose any problems, but when it comes time to subdivide, the differences in polygon density at the equator and at the poles produces pinching, and squashes the sphere around the equator.

Click any screenshot below for full resolution.

 

Comparison of a Polygonal Sphere and a Quad Sphere

Here are the spheres unsmoothed.

comparison_01

When the spheres are smoothed, they both deform in different ways.

comparison_02

You can see how the Polygonal Sphere’s smoothing causes problems once a shader is added.  Little ridges are created at the top of the sphere.

comparison_03

You can see the ridges with a chrome material applied also.

comparison_04

While the effect is subtle, you should be able to see the faint star pattern within the normal sphere at the poles where the lighting and reflections get distorted as the sphere is subdivided. Moreover, it can’t simply be fixed by removing every other edge that’s converging to that one vertex to make the pole faces quads. The distortion is a direct result of the fact that it’s a curved surface where the pole exists.

As such, a far better approach is to build a quad sphere, which not only eliminates this pole problem entirely, but is completely CheckMate Pro v2 compliant. Here’s how you can accomplish this quickly in each of the major 3D applications.

(more…)

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